Grammar Rules Quiz

This English Grammar Quiz presents 25 multiple-choice questions to test your knowledge of Grammar Rules. Each MCQ has four options, a correct answer, and an explanation. Go ahead and test your knowledge!

1. When do we use 'fewer' instead of 'less'?

a) With countable nouns
b) With uncountable nouns
c) Before adjectives
d) In negative sentences

Answer:

a) With countable nouns

Explanation:

'Fewer' is used with countable nouns to indicate a smaller number, whereas 'less' is used with uncountable nouns to indicate a smaller amount.

2. What is the rule for using 'who' and 'whom'?

a) 'Who' as subject and 'whom' as object
b) 'Who' as object and 'whom' as subject
c) 'Who' in formal language, 'whom' in informal
d) 'Who' and 'whom' can be used interchangeably

Answer:

a) 'Who' as subject and 'whom' as object

Explanation:

'Who' is used as the subject of a verb, and 'whom' is used as the object of a verb or preposition.

3. What is the correct order of adjectives in English?

a) Size, age, color, origin, material
b) Color, size, material, origin, age
c) Age, size, color, material, origin
d) Origin, material, color, age, size

Answer:

a) Size, age, color, origin, material

Explanation:

The general order of adjectives in English is quantity or number, quality or opinion, size, age, shape, color, proper adjective (often nationality, other place of origin, or material), purpose or qualifier.

4. When should 'its' and 'it's' be used?

a) 'Its' for contraction of 'it is', 'it's' for possession
b) 'It's' for contraction of 'it is', 'its' for possession
c) 'Its' in formal writing, 'it's' in informal writing
d) 'Its' and 'it's' can be used interchangeably

Answer:

b) 'It's' for contraction of 'it is', 'its' for possession

Explanation:

'It's' is a contraction for 'it is' or 'it has', while 'its' is a possessive pronoun meaning 'belonging to it'.

5. What is the passive voice?

a) When the subject performs the action
b) When the action is performed by the subject
c) When the action is performed on the subject
d) When the subject is mentioned at the beginning of the sentence

Answer:

c) When the action is performed on the subject

Explanation:

In passive voice, the subject of the sentence is acted upon by the verb. The focus is on the action being done to the subject, not who is doing the action.

6. How do you form the present perfect tense?

a) Have/has + past participle
b) Will have + past participle
c) Have/has + base form of the verb
d) Had + past participle

Answer:

a) Have/has + past participle

Explanation:

The present perfect tense is formed using 'have/has' followed by the past participle of the verb. It's used for actions completed at the time of speaking or for actions that occurred at an unspecified time in the past.

7. What is a split infinitive and is it considered correct?

a) Splitting an infinitive, always incorrect
b) Placing an adverb between 'to' and the verb, traditionally incorrect but now widely accepted
c) Using 'to' separately from the verb, always correct
d) Removing 'to' from the infinitive, never correct

Answer:

b) Placing an adverb between 'to' and the verb, traditionally incorrect but now widely accepted

Explanation:

A split infinitive occurs when an adverb is placed between 'to' and the base form of the verb (e.g., 'to boldly go'). Though once considered grammatically incorrect, it is now widely accepted in modern English usage.

8. When do you use 'me' instead of 'I'?

a) As the subject of the sentence
b) As the object of the verb or preposition
c) In formal writing only
d) When referring to oneself in a group

Answer:

b) As the object of the verb or preposition

Explanation:

'Me' is used as the object of a verb or preposition, while 'I' is used as the subject of a sentence.

9. What is an Oxford comma and where is it used?

a) A comma used after the last item in a list, optional
b) A comma before 'and' in a list, mandatory
c) A comma used in formal writing only
d) A comma used to separate two independent clauses

Answer:

a) A comma used after the last item in a list, optional

Explanation:

The Oxford comma is an optional comma placed before 'and' or 'or' in a list of three or more items. Its use can clarify meaning.

10. How do you use 'either…or' and 'neither…nor'?

a) 'Either…or' for negative choices, 'neither…nor' for positive choices
b) 'Either…or' for alternatives, 'neither…nor' for negating both parts of a choice
c) 'Either…or' in questions, 'neither…nor' in statements
d) 'Either…or' and 'neither…nor' can be used interchangeably

Answer:

b) 'Either…or' for alternatives, 'neither…nor' for negating both parts of a choice

Explanation:

'Either…or' is used to present two alternatives, while 'neither…nor' is used to negate both parts of a choice, indicating that neither option is true or acceptable.

11. What is the difference between 'who' and 'whom'?

a) 'Who' for subjects, 'whom' for objects
b) 'Who' for objects, 'whom' for subjects
c) No difference, interchangeable
d) 'Who' in formal writing, 'whom' in informal

Answer:

a) 'Who' for subjects, 'whom' for objects

Explanation:

'Who' is used as a subject pronoun, while 'whom' is used as an object pronoun in a sentence.

12. When is 'whichever' used?

a) To refer to people
b) As a formal alternative to 'who'
c) To refer to a choice from a defined set
d) To introduce a relative clause

Answer:

c) To refer to a choice from a defined set

Explanation:

'Whichever' is used to refer to a choice from a set of alternatives, indicating that any of the options would be acceptable.

13. How is 'whomever' correctly used?

a) As the subject of a verb
b) As the object of a verb or preposition
c) To introduce a clause
d) As an alternative to 'whoever'

Answer:

b) As the object of a verb or preposition

Explanation:

'Whomever' is the objective case of 'whoever' and is used as the object of a verb or preposition.

14. When should you use 'whoever'?

a) As the object of a verb or preposition
b) As the subject of a verb
c) In formal settings only
d) To refer to non-human subjects

Answer:

b) As the subject of a verb

Explanation:

'Whoever' is used as the subject of a verb, similar to 'who'. It is the nominative case of 'whomever'.

15. What is the function of a relative pronoun?

a) To ask a question
b) To introduce a subordinate clause
c) To show possession
d) To indicate time

Answer:

b) To introduce a subordinate clause

Explanation:

A relative pronoun like 'who', 'whom', 'whose', 'which', or 'that' is used to introduce a subordinate (relative) clause, connecting it to a main clause.

16. When do you use 'that' instead of 'which'?

a) In defining relative clauses
b) In non-defining relative clauses
c) When referring to people
d) In informal language

Answer:

a) In defining relative clauses

Explanation:

'That' is used in defining relative clauses, which provide essential information about the noun they refer to. 'Which' is used in non-defining relative clauses, which add extra information.

17. How do you choose between 'shall' and 'will'?

a) 'Shall' for offers and suggestions, 'will' for future events
b) 'Shall' in formal language, 'will' in informal
c) 'Shall' for first person, 'will' for second and third persons
d) No difference, interchangeable

Answer:

c) 'Shall' for first person, 'will' for second and third persons

Explanation:

Traditionally, 'shall' is used with first person subjects (I, we) for simple future tense, while 'will' is used with second and third person subjects. However, in modern usage, 'will' is commonly used for all subjects.

18. What is the rule for using 'a' and 'an'?

a) 'A' before consonant sounds, 'an' before vowel sounds
b) 'A' before vowel sounds, 'an' before consonant sounds
c) 'A' in formal writing, 'an' in informal
d) 'A' for specific items, 'an' for general items

Answer:

a) 'A' before consonant sounds, 'an' before vowel sounds

Explanation:

a is used before words that start with a consonant sound, while an is used before words that start with a vowel sound.

19. When is the subjunctive mood used in English?

a) To express facts
b) To express wishes, suggestions, or conditions contrary to fact
c) In most statements in the present tense
d) To create a question

Answer:

b) To express wishes, suggestions, or conditions contrary to fact

Explanation:

The subjunctive mood is used to express wishes, hypotheticals, demands, or suggestions, often in sentences that express conditions contrary to fact, like "If I were you, I would…"

20. How do you form the plural of nouns ending in 'y'?

a) Add 's'
b) Add 'es'
c) Change 'y' to 'i' and add 'es'
d) No change is needed

Answer:

c) Change 'y' to 'i' and add 'es'

Explanation:

For most nouns ending in 'y', if the 'y' is preceded by a consonant, change the 'y' to 'i' and add 'es' (e.g., 'city' becomes 'cities').

21. What is the rule for the placement of adverbs of frequency?

a) Before the main verb
b) After the main verb
c) At the beginning of the sentence
d) At the end of the sentence

Answer:

a) Before the main verb

Explanation:

Adverbs of frequency (such as 'often', 'usually', 'sometimes') are typically placed before the main verb but after the verb 'to be'.

22. When should you use 'fewer' instead of 'less'?

a) With uncountable nouns
b) With countable nouns
c) In formal writing
d) Before adjectives

Answer:

b) With countable nouns

Explanation:

'Fewer' is used with countable nouns to indicate a smaller quantity, whereas 'less' is used with uncountable nouns to indicate a smaller amount.

23. What is the rule for using 'among' and 'between'?

a) 'Among' for two items, 'between' for more than two
b) 'Among' for more than two items, 'between' for two items
c) 'Among' in American English, 'between' in British English
d) 'Among' for general references, 'between' for specific references

Answer:

b) 'Among' for more than two items, 'between' for two items

Explanation:

'Between' is used when referring to two items, groups, or people, while 'among' is used when referring to more than two.

24. How do you form the comparative and superlative of one-syllable adjectives?

a) Add 'er' for comparative, 'est' for superlative
b) Add 'more' for comparative, 'most' for superlative
c) No change for comparative, add 'est' for superlative
d) Add 'less' for comparative, 'least' for superlative

Answer:

a) Add 'er' for comparative, 'est' for superlative

Explanation:

For most one-syllable adjectives, form the comparative by adding 'er' and the superlative by adding 'est' (e.g., 'tall', 'taller', 'tallest').

25. What is the rule for the use of 'much' and 'many'?

a) 'Much' for countable nouns, 'many' for uncountable nouns
b) 'Much' for uncountable nouns, 'many' for countable nouns
c) 'Much' in questions, 'many' in negative sentences
d) 'Much' and 'many' can be used interchangeably

Answer:

b) 'Much' for uncountable nouns, 'many' for countable nouns

Explanation:

Use 'much' with uncountable nouns to indicate a large amount and 'many' with countable nouns to indicate a large number.

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